The Science of Love

The Science of Love

You’ve seen the romantic comedies popular around this time of year, full of unrealistic high stakes courting and fantastical circumstances. However, there is one trope these movies get right: falling in love does have actual physical effects on the body. Studies show that your pupils dilate when looking at someone you are attracted to, and because of this reaction of the sympathetic nervous system we are evolutionarily conditioned to subconsciously see larger pupils as more attractive. Everyone is familiar with the stereotypical racing heartbeat and sweaty palms that come with talking to the object of your romantic interest. This happens when your brain signals the release of adrenaline and norepinephrine, triggering a reaction that’s somewhere between euphoric and “fight or flight.”

It turns out your brain, and not your heart, is the most important biological system when it comes to falling in love. The power your brain has over the rest of your body is incredible. It is able to take input (such as seeing your loved one) and create physical change in your body (like a racing heart or butterflies in your stomach). This is all made possible through a healthy connection between brain and body– your nervous system, housed and protected by your spine. When that connection is interrupted by misalignment, your whole body can suffer. This February, show some love to yourself and your family and get checked by a Chiropractic Physician.

By Dr. Bryen A. Bell, a Board-Certified Chiropractic Physician with over 20 years of professional experience. He practices with his wife and operates True Potential Chiropractic family care facility. For more info, call 503-574-4872 or visit tpcportland.com. Photo by Joyce McCown on Unsplash